University of California, Santa Barbara

Courses

2014/15 Course Schedules*

 

 

*All schedules subject to change


Course & Student Announcements - Important Please Read!

 

  • MANDATORY All 14/15 JUNIORS must meet with Suzi See before the end of Fall Quarter for a Degree Audit.  No appointment is necessary; you can just stop by anytime M-F 8:00 - 11:30 or 1:30 - 4:30.
  • MANDATORY ME 12S, Intro to Machine Shop, Organizational meeting for Fall '14, FRIDAY, OCT 3, 3:00 in the Machine Shop, ARTS 0249   You must attend to be enrolled in the class.


 

 

Course Resources

 

Mechanical Engineering Undergraduate Course Descriptions

 

Lower Division Courses
 
ME 6. Basic Electrical and Electronic Circuits
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Physics 3-3L; Mathematics 3C or 4A; open to ME majors only.
Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Winter. Not open for credit to students who have completed ECE 2A or 2B, or ECE 6A or 6B.
Introduction to basic electrical circuits and electronics. Includes Kirchhoff's laws, phasor analysis, circuit elements, operational amplifiers and transistor circuits.
ME 10. Engineering Graphics: Sketching, CAD and Conceptual Design
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering majors only.
Introduction to engineering graphics, CAD, and freehand sketching. Develop CAD proficiency using advanced 3-D software. Graphical presentation of design: views, sections, dimensioning, and tolerancing.
ME 11. Introductory Concepts in Mechanical Engineering
(1) BOTHMAN, FIELDS, BELTZ
Prerequisite: Lower-division standing.
The theme question of this course is, "What do mechanical engineers do?" Survey of mechanical and environmental engineering applications. Lectures by mechanical engineering faculty and practicing engineers.
ME 12. Manufacturing Processes
(1) BOTHMAN
Prerequisite: ME majors only.
Processes used to convert raw material into finished objects. Overview of manufacturing processes including: casting, forging, machining, presswork, plastic and composite processing. Videos, demonstrations, and tours illustrate modern industrial practice. Selection of appropriate processes.
ME 12S. Introduction to Machine Shop
(1) STAFF
Prerequisite: Mechanical engineering majors only.
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who havecompleted Mechanical Engineering 156S.
Basic machine shop skills course. Students learn to work safely in a machine shop. Students are introduced to the use of hand tools, the lathe, the milling machine, drill press, saws, and precision measuring tools. Students apply these skills by completing a project.
ME 14. Statics
(4) BELTZ, SHUGAR, TURNER
Prerequisite: Math 3B, or AP Calculus AB with a score of 5, or AP Calculus BC with a score of 3 or better; and Physics 1
Introduction to applied mechanics. Forces, moments, couples, and resultants; vector algebra; construction of free body diagrams; equilibrium in 2- and 3- dimensions; analysis of frames, machines, trusses and beams; distributed forces; friction.
ME 15. Strength of Materials
(4) BELTZ, KEDWARD
Prerequisite: ME 14 with a minimum grade of C-; open to mechanical engineering majors only.
Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Fall.
Properties of structural materials, including Hooke’s law and behavior beyond the elastic limit. Concepts of stress, strain, displacement, force, force systems, and multiaxial stress states. Design applications to engineering structures, including problems of bars in tension, compression, and torsion, beams subject to flexure, pressure vessels, and buckling.
ME 16. Engineering Mechanics: Dynamics
(4) TURNER, MEZIC, BAMIEH
Prerequisite: Physics 2, ME 14 with a minimum grade of C-, Mathematics 5C or 6B (may be taken concurrently); open to ME majors only.
Vectorial kinematics of particles. Coordinate systems, moving frames, relative and constrained motion. Dynamics of particles and systems of particles. Energy and momentum methods. Collisions. Planar kinematics and kinematics of rigid bodies. Energy and momentum methods for rigid body systems.
ME 17. Mathematics of Engineering
(3) MOEHLIS, GIBOU
Prerequisite: Engineering 3; Mathematics 5B or 6A (may be taken concurrently); open to ME majors only.
Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Spring, Summer.
Introduction to basic numerical and analytical methods, with implementation using MATLAB. Topics include root finding, linear algebraic equations, introduction to matrix algebra, determinants, inverses and eigenvalues, curve fitting and interpolation, and numerical differentiation and integration.
ME 95. Introduction to Mechanical Engineering
(1-4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 6 units.
Participation in projects in the laboratory or machine shop. Projects may be student- or faculty-originated depending upon student interest and consent of faculty member.
ME 97. Mechanical Engineering Design Projects
(1-4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for maximum of 12 units.
Course offers students opportunity to work on established departmental design projects. P/NP grading, does not satisfy technical elective requirement.
ME 99. Introduction to Research
(1-3) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 6 units. Students are limited to 5 units per quarter and 30 units total in all 98/99/198/199/199AA-ZZ courses combined.
Directed study to be arranged with individual faculty members. Course offers exceptional students an opportunity to participate in a research group.
Upper Division  Courses

ME 100. Professional Seminar
(1) STAFF
Prerequisite: Undergraduate standing.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for up to 3 units. May not be used as a departmental elective.
A series of weekly lectures given by university staff and outside experts in all fields of mechanical and environmental engineering.
ME 104. Mechatronics
(3) BAMIEH, PADEN
Prerequisite: ME 6; open to ME majors only.
Interfacing of mechanical and electrical systems and mechatronics. Basic introduction to sensors, actuators, and computer interfacing and control. Transducers and measurement devices, actuators, A/D and D/A conversion, signal conditioning and filtering. Practical skills developed in weekly lab exercises.
ME 105. Mechanical Engineering Laboratory
(4) BENNETT, MATTHYS, VALENTINE
Prerequisite: ME 151B, 152B, 163; and, Materials 101 or 100B.
Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Spring.
Introduction to fundamental engineering laboratory measurement techniques and report writing skills. Experiments from thermosciences, fluid mechanics, mechanics, materials science and environmental engineering. Introduction to modern data acquisition and analysis techniques.
ME 106A. Advanced Mechanical Engineering Laboratory
(3) KHAMMASH, BAMIEH
Prerequisite: ME 155A.
An advanced lab course with experiments in dynamical systems and feedback control design. Students design, troubleshoot, and perform detailed, multi-session experiments.
ME 106B. Mechanics, Materials and Structures Laboratory
(3) ZOK
Prerequisite: ME 15; ME 154; ME 156A; and Materials 100B or 101.
Experiments on mechanical behavior of materials and structures. Assessment of analytical and finite element methods for mechanical design, with applications to optimization of lightweight structures.
ME 106C. Advanced Thermo/Fluids Laboratory
(3) BENNETT, MCLEAN
Prerequisite: ME 105 and 151A-B, ME 151C (may be concurrent) and ME 152A-B
Perform thermo/fluid experiments that emphasize elements of thermodynamics, heat transfer, and fluid mechanics. This laboratory course stresses critical thinking skills required to construct and perform experiments independently, and to investigate physical phenomena experimentally.
ME 110. Aerodynamics and Aeronautical Engineering
(3) BELTZ, MEINHART
Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 14 and 152A.
Concepts from aerodynamics, including lift and drag analysis for airfoils as well as aircraft sizing/scaling issues. Structural mechanics concepts are applied to practical aircraft design. Intended for students considering a career in aeronautical engineering.
ME 112. Energy
(3) MATTHYS
Prerequisite: Senior Undergraduate or Graduate Student status in the College of Engineering; or consent of Instructor
Introduction to the field of Energetics. Topics may include energy sources and production, energy usage, renewable technologies, hardware, operating principles, environmental impact, energy reserves, national and global energy budgets, historical perspectives, economics, societal considerations, and others.
ME 119. Introduction to Coastal Engineering
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: ME 152A.
Quantitative description of waves and tides; refraction, shoaling. Nearshore circulation. Sediment characteristics and transport; equilibrium beach profile; shoreline protection.
ME 124. Advanced Topics in Transport Phenomena/Safety
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: Chemical Engineering 120A-B-C; or, Mechanical Engineering 151A-B and 152A.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Chemical Engineering 124.
Hazard identification and assessments, runaway reactions, emergency relief. Plant accidents and safety issues. Dispersion and consequences of releases.
ME 125AAZZ. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 12 units provided letter designations are different. Students are advised to consult their faculty advisor before making their course selection.
Individual courses each concentrating on one area in the following subjects: applied mechanics, cad/cam, controls, design, environmental engineering, fluid mechanics, materials science, mechanics of solids and structures, ocean and coastal engineering, robotics, theoretical mechanics,thermal sciences, and recent developments in mechanical engineering.
ME 128. Design of Biomedical Devices
(3) LAGUETTE
Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 10, 14, 15, 16, and 153; open to ME majors only.
Introductory course addresses the challenges of biomedical device design, prototyping and testing, material considerations, regulatory requirements, design control, human factors and ethics.
ME 134. Advanced Thermal Science
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 151C.
This class will address advanced topics in fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and thermodynamics. Topics if interest may include combustion, phase change, experimental techniques, materials processing, manufacturing, engines, HVAC, non-newtonian fluids, etc.
ME 136. Introduction to Multiphase Flows
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: Chemical Engineering 120A-B-C; or, ME 151C and 152A.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Chemical Engineering 136.
Development from basic concepts and techniques of fluid mechanics and heat transfer, to local behavior in multiphase flows. Key multiphase phenomena, related physics. Extension to local conservation principles to usable formulations in multiphase flows, modelling approaches. Practical examples.
ME 140A. Numerical Analysis in Engineering
(3) MOEHLIS, GIBOU, MEIBURG
Prerequisite: ME 17 with a minimum grade of C-, or Chemical Engineering 132A.
Enrollment Comments: Designed for majors. Quarters usually offered: Fall.
Numerical analysis and analytical solutions of problems described by linear and nonlinear differential equations with an emphasis on MATLAB. First and second order differential equations; systems of differential equations; linear algebraic equations, matrices and eigenvalues; boundary value problems; finite differences.
ME 140B. Theoretical Analysis in Mechanical Engineering
(3) MOEHLIS, GIBOU, MEIBURG
Prerequisite: ME 140A.
Analysis of engineering problems formulated in terms of partial differential equations. Solutions of these mathematical models by means of analytical and numerical methods. Physical interpretation of the results.
ME 141A. Introduction to Nanoelectromechanical and Microelectromechanical systems (NEMS/MEMS)
(3) PENNATHUR, TURNER
Prerequisite: ME 16 & 17; ME 152A & ME 151A (may be concurrent); or ECE 130A & 137A with a minimum grade of C- in both.
Introduction to nano- and microtechnology. Scaling laws and nanoscale physics are stressed. Individual subjects at the nanoscale including materials, mechanics, photonics, electronics, and fluidics will be described, with an emphasis on differences of behavior at the nanoscale and real-world examples.
ME 141B. MEMS: Processing and Device Characterization
(4) PENNATHUR, TURNER
Prerequisite: ME 141A, ME 163 (may be concurrent); or ECE 141A.
Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Winter.
Lectures and laboratory on semiconductor-based processing for MEMS. Description of key equipment and characterization tools used for MEMS and design, fabrication, characterization and testing of MEMS. Emphasis on current MEMS devices including accelerometers, comb drives, micro-reactors and capacitor-actuators.
ME 141C. Introduction to Microfluidics and BioMEMS
(3) MEINHART
Prerequisite: ME 141A or ECE 141A; open to ME and EE majors only.
Introduces physical phenomena associated with microscale/nanoscale fluid mechanics, microfluids, and bioMEMS. Analytical methods and numerical simulation tools are used for analysis of microfluids.
ME 146. Molecular and Cellular Biomechanics
(3) VALENTINE
Enrollment Comments: Concurrently offered with ME 246. Quarters usually offered: Fall.
Course introduces fundamental concepts in molecular and cellular biomechanics. Will consider the role of physical, thermal and chemical forces, examine their influence on cell strength and elasticity, and explore the properties of enzymatically-active materials.
ME 151A. Thermosciences 1
(4) BENNETT, MEINHART
Prerequisite: Physics 2; ME 14 with a minimum grade of C-; and, Mathematics 5C.
Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Fall.
Basic concepts in thermodynamics, system analysis, energy, thermodynamic laws, and cycles.
ME 151B. Thermosciences 2
(4) BENNETT
Prerequisite: ME 151A and 152A.
Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Winter.
Introduction to heat transfer processes, steady and unsteady state conduction, multidimensional analysis. Introduction to convective heat transfer.
ME 151C. Thermosciences 3
(3) BENNETT
Prerequisite: ME 151B and 152B. Open to ME majors only.
Convective heat transfer, external and internal flow, forced and free convection, phase change, heat exchangers. Introduction to radiative heat transfer.
ME 152A. Fluid Mechanics
(4) KRETCHETNIKOV, MEINHART
Prerequisite: Mathematics 5C; and, ME 16 with a minimum grade of C-.
Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Fall.
Introduction to the fundamental concepts in fluid mechanics and basic fluid properties. Basic equations of fluid flow. Dimensional analysis and similitude. Hydrodynamics.
ME 152B. Fluid Mechanics
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: ME 152A. Open to ME majors only.
Incompressible viscous flow. Turbomachinery. Boundary-layer theory. Introductory considerations for one-dimensional compressible flow.
ME 153. Introduction to Mechanical Engineering Design
(3) BELTZ, TURNER, KEDWARD
Prerequisite: ME 10 and 16; open to ME majors only.
Design of systems using mechanics, stress analysis and finite elements. Statistical problems in manufacturing and reliability. Ethics. One paper design project plus the ASME student design project.
ME 154. Design and Analysis of Structures
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: ME 15 with a minimum grade of C-; and, ME 16 with a minimum grade of C-; open to ME majors only.
Introductory course in structural analysis and design. The theories of matrix structural analysis and finite element analysis for the solution of analytical and design problems in structures are emphasized. Lecture material includes structural theory compatibility method, slope deflection method, displacement method, and virtual work. Topics include applications to bars, beams, trusses, frames, and solids.
ME 155A. Control System Design
(3) BAMIEH, BULLO, KHAMMASH
Prerequisite: ME 17 with a minimum grade of C-; ME 140A (may be taken concurrently); ME 163.
The discipline of control and its application. Dynamics and feedback. The mathematical models: transfer functions and state space descriptions. Simple control design (PID). Assessment of a control problem, specification, fundamental limitations, codesign of system and control.
ME 155B. Control System Design
(3) PADEN
Prerequisite: ME 155A.
Dynamic system modeling using state-space methods, controllability and observability, state-space methods for control design including pole placement, and linear quadratic regulator methods. Observers and observer-based feedback controllers. Sampled-data and digital control. Laboratory exercises using MATLAB for simulation and control design.
ME 156A. Mechanical Engineering Design - I
(3) TURNER, LUCAS, MCMEEKING
Prerequisite: ME 151C, ME 152B, ME 153 and MATRL 101 (or MATRL 100B); open to ME majors only
The rational selection of engineering materials, and the utilization of Ashby- charts, stress, strain, strength, and fatigue failure consideration as applied to the design of machine elements. Lectures also support the development of system design concepts using assigned projects and involves the preparation of engineering reports and drawings.
ME 156B. Mechanical Engineering Design-II
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: ME 156A. Open to ME majors only.
Machine elements including gears, bearings and shafts. Joint design and analysis: bolts, rivets, adhesive bonding and welding. Machine dynamics andfatigue. Design reliability and safety. Codes and standards. Topics coveredwill be applies in practical design projects.
ME 158. Computer Aided Design and Manufacturing
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: ME 10 and ME 156A; open to ME majors only.
Engineering applications using advanced 3-D CAD software for plastic part designs and tooling. Topics include an overview of the design for injection molded plastic parts, material selections and electronic tooling design via CAD and CNC system software. Emphasis is put into final design projects that are designed to be functional, manufacturable and esthetically pleasing.
ME 162. Introduction to Elasticity
(3) MCMEEKING, BELTZ
Prerequisite: ME 15 and 140A.
Equations of equilibrium, compatibility, and boundary conditions. Solutionsof two-dimensional problems in rectangular and polar coordinates. Eigen-solutions for the Wedge and Williams' solution for cracks. Stress intensity factors. Extension, torsion, and bending. Energy theorems. Introduction to wave propagation in elastic solids.
ME 163. Engineering Mechanics: Vibrations
(3) MCMEEKING, MEZIC
Prerequisite: ME 16 with a minimum grade of C-; open to ME majors only.
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who have completed ME 163B.
Topics relating to vibration in mechanical systems; exact and approximate methods of analysis, matrix methods, generalized coordinates and Lagrange's equations, applications of systems. Basic feedback systems and controlled dynamic behavior.
ME 166. Advanced Strength of Materials
(3) TURNER, KEDWARD
Prerequisite: ME 15.
Analysis of statically determinate and indeterminate systems using integration, area moment, and energy methods. Beams on elastic foundations,curved beams, stress concentrations, fatigue, and theories of failure for ductile and brittle materials. Photoelasticity and other experimental techniques are covered, as well as methods of interpreting in-service failures.
ME 167. Structural Analysis
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: ME 15 or 165; and, ME 140A.
Presents introductory matrix methods for analysis of structures. Topics include review of matrix algebra and linear equations, basic structural theorms including the principle of superposition and energy theorms, truss bar, bean and plane frame elements, and programming techniques to realize these concepts.
ME 169. Nonlinear Phenomena
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Physics 105A; or ME 163 or upper-division standing in ECE.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as ECE 183 and Physics 106. Not open for credit to students who have completed ECE 163C.
An introduction to nonlinear phenomena. Flows and bifurcations in one and two dimensions, chaos, fractals, strange attractors. Applications to physics, engineering, chemistry, and biology.
ME 179D. Introduction to Robotics: Dynamics and Control
(4) BYL
Prerequisite: ECE 130A or ME 155A (may be taken concurrently)
Dynamic modeling and control methods for robotic systems. Lagrangian method for deriving equations of motion, introduction to the Jacobian, and modeling and control of forces and contact dynamics at a robotic end effector. Laboratories encourage a problem-solving approach to control.
ME 179L. Introduction to Robotics: Design Laboratory
(4) PADEN
Prerequisite: Engr 3; and ME 6 or ECE 2A. Not open for credit to students who have completed ME 170C or ECE 181C.
Design, programming, and testing of mobile robots. Design problems are formulated in terms of robot performance. Students solve electromechanical problems, developing skills in brainstorming, concept selection, spatial reasoning, teamwork and communication. Robots are controlled with micro- controllers using C programming and interfaced to sensors and motors.
ME 179P. Introduction to Robotics: Planning and Kinematics
(4) BULLO
Prerequisite: Engr 3; and either ME 17 or ECE 130C (may be taken concurrently). Not open for credit to students who have completed ME 170A or ECE 181A.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as ECE 179P
Motion planning and kinematics topics with an emphasis on geometric reasoning, programming and matrix computations. Motion planning: configuration spaces, sensor-based planning, decomposition and sampling methods, and advanced planning algorithms. Kinematics: reference frames, rotations and displacements, kinematic motion models.
ME 185. Materials in Engineering
(3) LEVI, ODETTE
Prerequisite: Materials 100B or 101.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Materials 185.
Introduces the student to the main families of materials and the principlesbehind their development, selection, and behavior. Discusses the generic properties of metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites more relevant to structural applications. The relationship of properties to structure and processing is emphasized in every case.
ME 186. Manufacturing and Materials
(3) LEVI
Prerequisite: ME 151C; and ME 15; and Materials 100B or 101.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Materials 186.
Introduction to the fundamentals of common manufacturing processes and their interplay with the structure and properties of materials as they are transformed into products. Emphasis on process understanding and the key physical and basic mathematical relationships involved in each of the processes discussed.
ME 189A. Capstone Mechanical Engineering Design Project
(2) LAGUETTE
Prerequisite: ME 153; and ME 156A (may be taken concurrently).
Enrollment Comments: Designed for majors. Concurrently offered with ME 156A. Quarters usually offered: Fall. A 3-quarter sequence with grades issued for each quarter. Students may not concurrently enroll in ME 197 and ME 189A-B-C with the same design project.
Repeat Comments: Course can only be repeated as a full sequence (189A-B-C).
Students work in teams under the direction of a faculty advisor (and possibly an industrial sponsor) to tackle an engineering design project. Engineering communication, such as reports and oral presentations are covered. Emphasis on practical, hands-on experience, and the integration of analytical and design skills acquired in the companion ME 156 courses.
ME 189B. Capstone Mechanical Engineering Design Project
(2) LAGUETTE
Prerequisite: ME 189A
Enrollment Comments: Designed for majors. Concurrently offered with ME 156B. Quarters usually offered: Winter. A 3-quarter sequence with grades issued for each quarter. Students may not concurrently enroll in ME 197 and ME 189A-B-C with the same design project.
Repeat Comments: Course can only be repeated as a full sequence (189A-B-C).
Students work in teams under the direction of a faculty advisor (and possibly an industrial sponsor) to tackle an engineering design project. Engineering communication, such as reports and oral presentations, are covered. Course emphasizes practical, hands-on experience, and integrates analytical and design skills acquired in the companion ME 156 courses.
ME 189C. Capstone Mechanical Engineering Design Project
(2) LAGUETTE
Prerequisite: ME 189A,B
Enrollment Comments: Designed for majors. Quarters usually offered: Spring. A 3-quarter sequence with grades issued for each quarter. Students may not concurrently enroll in ME 197 and ME 189A-B-C with the same design project.
Repeat Comments: Course can only be repeated as a full sequence (189A-B-C).
Students work in teams under the direction of a faculty advisor (and possibly an industrial sponsor) to tackle an engineering design project. Engineering communication, such as reports and oral presentations, are covered. Course emphasizes practical, hands-on experience, and integrates analytical and design skills acquired in the companion ME 156 courses.
ME 193. Internship in Industry
(1) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Prior departmental approval needed.
Enrollment Comments: Cannot be used as a departmental elective. May be repeated to a maximum of 2 units.
Students obtain credit for a mechanical engineering related internship and/or industrial experience under faculty supervision. A 6-10 page written report is required for credit. It may NOT be used to satisfy the engineering elective requirement for ME majors.
ME 197. Independent Projects in Mechanical Engineering Design
(1-4) STAFF
Prerequisite: ME 16; consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for a maximum of 12 units. No more than 4 units may be used as departmental electives.
Special projects in design engineering. Course offers motivated students opportunity to synthesize academic skills by designing and building new machines.
ME 199. Independent Studies in Mechanical Engineering
(1-5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor; upper-division standing; completion of two upper-division courses in Mechanical Engineering.
Enrollment Comments: Students must have a minimum 3.0 grade-point average for the preceding 3 quarters and are limited to 5 units per quarter and 30 units total in all 98/99/198/199/199DC/199RA courses combined. May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 12 units but no more than four units may be used as departmental electives.
Directed individual study.
Introduction to Mechanical Engineering Design
contact mechanical engineering